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They point out that the abbreviated form of the name is Yah (Jah in the Latinized form), as at Psalm 89:8 and in the expression found in the Hebrew spelling of the names Jehoshaphat, Joshaphat, Shephatiah, and others, can all be derived from Yahweh.

Greek transliterations of the name by early Christian writers point in a somewhat similar direction with spellings such as which, as pronounced in Greek, resemble Yahweh.

’” (7:5 states that a blasphemer was not guilty ‘unless he pronounced the Name,’ and that in a trial involving a charge of blasphemy a substitute name was used until all the evidence had been heard; then the chief witness was asked privately to ‘say expressly what he had heard,’ presumably employing the divine name.

10:1, in listing those “that have no share in the world to come,” states: “Abba Saul says: Also he that pronounces the Name with its proper letters.” Yet, despite these negative views, one also finds in the first section of the Mishnah the positive injunction that “a man should salute his fellow with [the use of] the Name [of God],” the example of Boaz (Ru 2:4) then being cited.​—9:5.

The purpose of words is to transmit thoughts; in English the name Jehovah identifies the true God, transmitting this thought more satisfactorily today than any of the suggested substitutes. Many modern scholars and Bible translators advocate following the tradition of eliminating the distinctive name of God.

They not only claim that its uncertain pronunciation justifies such a course but also hold that the supremacy and uniqueness of the true God make unnecessary his having a particular name.

The oldest Hebrew manuscripts present the name in the form of four consonants, commonly called the Tetragrammaton (from Greek ).

(Isa 42:8; 54:5) Though Scripturally designated by such descriptive titles as “God,” “Sovereign Lord,” “Creator,” “Father,” “the Almighty,” and “the Most High,” his personality and attributes​—who and what he is—​are fully summed up and expressed only in this personal name.​—Ps . “Jehovah” is the best known English pronunciation of the divine name, although “Yahweh” is favored by most Hebrew scholars.

Non-Biblical Hebrew documents, such as the so-called Lachish Letters, show the name was used in regular correspondence in Palestine during the latter part of the seventh century B. However, Jehovah himself said that he would ‘have his name declared in all the earth’ (Ex ; compare 1Ch , 24; Ps 113:3; Mal , 14), to be known even by his adversaries. 119) Another claim is that the purpose was to protect the name from use in magical rites. Josephus, a Jewish historian from a priestly family, when recounting God’s revelation to Moses at the site of the burning bush, says: “Then God revealed to him His name, which ere then had not come to men’s ears, and of which I am forbidden to speak.” (II, 276 [xii, 4]) Josephus’ statement, however, besides being inaccurate as to knowledge of the divine name prior to Moses, is vague and does not clearly reveal just what the general attitude current in the first century was as to pronouncing or using the divine name.

1561, 1562.) The very frequency of the appearance of the name attests to its importance to the Bible’s Author, whose name it is. When a person puts his ‘name’ upon a thing or another person the latter comes under his influence and protection.”​—) is applied to Jehovah, the true God, and also to false gods, such as the Philistine god Dagon (Jg , 24; 1Sa 5:7) and the Assyrian god Nisroch.

Its use throughout the Scriptures far outnumbers that of any of the titles, such as “Sovereign Lord” or “God,” applied to him. Manley points out: “A study of the word ‘name’ in the O[ld] T[estament] reveals how much it means in Hebrew. (2Ki ) For a Hebrew to tell a Philistine or an Assyrian that he worshiped “God [he means Jehovah. The same is true of the Greek term for God, It was applied alike to the true God and to such pagan gods as Zeus and Hermes (Roman Jupiter and Mercury).

That “God the Father” has a name, one that is distinct from his Son’s name, is shown in numerous texts.

(Mt ; Re ; 14:1) Paul knew the personal name of God, Jehovah, as found in the creation account in Genesis, from which Paul quoted in his writings.

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